Unusual jams

ImageI find it all but impossible to resist jams. The one in the middle, the finished one, is a very unusual jam from Bosnia-Herzegovina which I found at the Salone del Gusto last year. When the guy said “service tree”, I thought I had misheard him. But going back and googling, there really is such a thing as a service tree. Apparently it used to be very common tree in England but is hardly seen these days. In the photo he showed me, the tree was gigantic, with apple-like fruits. The jam was barely sweetened and it had a prune-like texture and taste. The rose jam is from Romania. While I am generally not a fan of rose jams, this one was subtle and not cloying. I’ve been having it with fromage frais, and i can imagine it with some Chantilly cream, especially with its pretty rose petals inside. The one on the left is Jerusalem artichoke jam! To be tested soon …

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5 thoughts on “Unusual jams

  1. Joanna

    What sort of tree is the service tree? I had a tree, now deceased which was called an amelanchier aka serviceberry tree, pretty early flowers and red berries in June which are tiny but edible – but that isn’t this one is it? I am going to look out for your service tree and do some research and see if I can track one down – a quest!

    Reply
    1. Nick B

      Amelanchier are a New World species and not related to European Service Trees.
      True Service Trees (Sorbus domestica) are the trees from which your Bosnian jam was made.They are indeed huge trees when fully grown,they bear apple-or pear-shaped fruit (depending on their variety) and there are some magnificent specimens in the Oxford Botanic Garden.They used to be cultivated in the UK,and wild examples are EXTREMELY rare (less than 100 known,in S Wales and Worcestershire)
      Wild Service Tree (Sorbus torminalis) is not a common tree in the UK but can be found sometimes in ancient woodland,particularly in the South.The berries (known as Chequers) are very tasty.

      Reply
  2. michaelawah

    I have zero knowledge in botany. I just know the man said it’s huge. The photo he showed me had quite a few people encircling the trunk of the tree with their arms.

    Reply
    1. Joanna

      Prompted by you I went searching for the service tree and I found it in books and then I found a small collection of wild service trees in Leigh Woods, Bristol and I will go back when they are in leaf and maybe in fruit and take some pictures. I have a picture of it now and its bark but it was from before it got warm and the leaves were most decidedly not out.

      Reply

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