Tag Archives: brioche

Tarte briochée

Tarte briochée

Tarte briochée

Make this. At least once, if not regularly. Your house will smell heavenly and your household—if not too curmudgeonly in the morning—might look to you with some gratitude. It’s good for breakfast, tea and even cold straight from the fridge. Days after. I can attest to that.

Used the last of summer fruits (not quite enough alas) but last week, we had red currants and blackberries, which I dropped in whole, as I like the contrast of sour. Watch out though for squirting when you bite into it.

Use your usual brioche recipe (mine is below). For the filling, I use whatever I have at hand: cream, ricotta, or better still, fresh raw-milk cream from the fromager in the market. Drop in one or two eggs (if too watery, use more yolks than whole eggs). Sprinkle some sugar. Lemon zest. Plop in the fruits, the more the better.

Brioche (Makes 1 very big tarte briochée)
250g          Flour
3g              Instant yeast
6g              Salt
25g           Sugar
25g           Milk
2              Large eggs (save the tiniest bit for egg washing the sides)
125g         Butter (I used slightly less this time, about 110g)

I mix everything then work in the butter bit by bit. Slow and long mixing till gluten is well developed. One-two hours outside, a fold, then into the fridge.
The next morning, roll out the dough. I also bounce it about my knuckles to thin out the middle. I use a lid or plate (lightly greased) to weigh down the middle. Proof till puffy.
Preheat oven to 200 degrees celsius. I like to bake it on the stone as the heat helps to ‘set’ the bottom fast.
Fill the middle. The middle needs to be sufficiently thin as the brioche will puff up in the oven and if  too thick, might remain uncooked. But don’t spring a leak! Egg wash the sides.
Glide as gently as possible into the oven. There is a scary moment when the quivering pond lurches to the side and threatens to spill but all is well.
Bake for some 30 mins. Watch out for browning and I had to tent with foil halfway through. I always have moments of doubt about its doneness—crust getting too hard! cream’s drying out, but is the middle cooked through?? I err on the cooked side.

Hours later, when you’ve forgotten you made this, the lingering sweet butteriness in the air (faint, not full-on like a tart or pie or cake) will remind you.

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Might brioche actually be good for the heart??? Avocado brioche

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Lovely green avocado brioche

A brioche that replaces butter (or oil) with avocado! When i first saw this, i had to make it. Can’t believe it has been more than two years since I last made this. My adaption below (namely, less sugar). The crust is very dark because I egg yolk-washed it, but the crumb is a nice pale green. You can taste the avocado in it, and I think it makes a particularly nice sandwich bread (somehow the taste of avocado reminds me of ham).

Use a sweet, dense and rich-tasting avocado for a better taste. Also I remember from the last time, the taste changed slightly the following day because of the avocado element. I think it’s at its best freshly baked. Won’t be able to tell this time because there’s none left!

Avocado Brioche (adapted from Versatile Vegetarian Kitchen)
Strong bread flour                            400g (can start with 360g and increase; depends on moisture level of avocado)
Milk powder                                        30g
Sugar                                                  30g
Instant yeast                                      1 TBS (in original; i’ll go for less the next time)
Salt                                                     1 tsp
Eggs                                                   3 large
Water                                                   55g
Avocado flesh                                     140g (about one medium-sized avocado)

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Brunch

 

Olive oil sourdough brioche from Tartine

 

Olive oil brioche

And brioche for Sunday! Orange-scented sourdough and poolish brioche with olive oil and honey from Chad Robertson’s Tartine. The first time I made this, I had used a more neutral olive oil and couldn’t really pick up on the taste, apart from the fact that it was not butter. This time I went for a stronger olive oil and I could smell it in the dough, the peppery notes while it was baking and after it was baked, I felt the olive oil actually worked against the orange flavor in this case. So I would say pick your olive oil carefully.

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I used Mulino Marino Manitoba strong flour lugged back from Italy, which I had been hoarding for panettonne. Sadly that did not materialize. This flour is organic and stone-ground and I was surprised by how snow white it was. The only flour I’ve seen this white is bleached flour. And even the bleached flour here isn’t always so purely white. Curious.

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Olive oil orange-scented sourdough brioche, adapted from Tartine (scaled down to a fourth of original recipe)

Poolish            100g (50g flour, 50g water, a pinch of instant yeast)
Leaven              75g
Flour                 250g
Salt                      6g
Instant yeast        3g
Eggs                 125g (I used 2 large)
Milk                    60g
Honey                40g (I used buckwheat honey because it was what i had on hand, not the best combination!)
Orange blossom water 12g
Olive oil             112g (I used 100g)
(I also added the zest of one orange)

My method differed. It was everything in except for olive oil. Work the dough (thank god I have a mixer now) until at least medium gluten, then trickle olive oil in, in batches, working dough all the time. I stopped once or twice for a few minutes when I felt dough and machine were getting warm. If I had the time, I might have rested the dough a bit more in between. Aim for silky and strong dough.

Proof until puffy – i did three or four folds. (It’s wonderful how the dough becomes less of a sticky monster.) I didn’t have the time to refrigerate the dough before shaping so i just plopped it into the mould, but a cold dough is really much, much better to work with.

I refrigerated overnight and baked straight from fridge. This dough is a monster! It grew so much in the fridge that it overflowed my mould. On hindsight, I should have removed a little of the dough. I don’t know why but this time the motif of the mould didn’t show up.

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The brioche was fluffy as they come, light, pull-apart fluffy. Bench notes to myself: try a fruity olive oil the next time and perhaps try adding orange essence, since I don’t have Fiori di Sicilia!

Submitting this to Wildyeast spotting